Presenter Information

John Mulcahy, Independent Scholar

Start Date

26-5-2020 12:15 PM

End Date

26-5-2020 12:30 PM

Description

Disruption, like change, is a constant in human history. So is food, a component of survival so vital that it, and the ecosystem which produces it, becomes as ‘invisible’ as breathing (Symons, 1998, p.185). Arguably, when the wellbeing of self, friends or family is at stake, food becomes a primary concern and we get innovative, no matter what role is imposed by the disruption, especially if violent. At a fundamental level, violent disruption redefines what food is, and how and when it is available (Mulcahy, 2019, p.24). in this regard, food parcels have been significant, particularly for both troops and prisoners in the World Wars; the Dublin Lockout strikers in 1913; the significant contribution from CARE (Committee of American Relief to Europe), and many more. Nonetheless, this paper has a single focus: the phenomenon and use of food parcels by Irish emigrant families.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.21427/b330-a961

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May 26th, 12:15 PM May 26th, 12:30 PM

Eating Abroad, Remembering Home: Violent Disruption, the Irish Diaspora, and their Food Parcels, 1845–1960

Disruption, like change, is a constant in human history. So is food, a component of survival so vital that it, and the ecosystem which produces it, becomes as ‘invisible’ as breathing (Symons, 1998, p.185). Arguably, when the wellbeing of self, friends or family is at stake, food becomes a primary concern and we get innovative, no matter what role is imposed by the disruption, especially if violent. At a fundamental level, violent disruption redefines what food is, and how and when it is available (Mulcahy, 2019, p.24). in this regard, food parcels have been significant, particularly for both troops and prisoners in the World Wars; the Dublin Lockout strikers in 1913; the significant contribution from CARE (Committee of American Relief to Europe), and many more. Nonetheless, this paper has a single focus: the phenomenon and use of food parcels by Irish emigrant families.