Document Type

Article

Rights

This item is available under a Creative Commons License for non-commercial use only

Disciplines

2. ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY

Publication Details

American Society for Engineering Education, 2011

Page 22.187.1 to page 22.187.11

Abstract

In the face of grand challenges for engineering, several efforts have been undertaken to identify the vision for what we should expect from our undergraduate engineering students. For example, one of the significant reports indicates that our graduates should aspire “to have the ingenuity of Lillian Gilbreth, the problem solving capabilities of Gordon Moore, the scientific insight of Albert Einstein, the creativity of Pablo Picasso, the determination of the Wright brothers, the leadership abilities of Bill Gates, the conscience of Eleanor Roosevelt, the vision of Martin Luther King, and the curiosity and wonder of our grandchildren.” This statement implies that not only should our graduates be very well equipped with analytical skills, but also master problem solving and professional skills. Indeed, given the near certainty that grand challenges will require complex problem solving skills in multi-disciplinary global settings, our graduates will need to develop professional skills to a higher degree than they currently do.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.21427/dqwt-7s98

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